Troubador Letters to the Editor

Released: 28/03/2020

eISBN: 9781838595760

Format: eBook

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Letters to the Editor

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During the 1980’s Jack Kelly was a celebrity broadcaster and successful novelist. Terrestrial television was enjoying its heyday and TV presenters started to receive the status of A-Lister celebrities. Jack’s life in the public eye allowed him a privileged position only a few experienced. He had access to select places and stars around the world, with an adoring army of fans.  


Several decades later, while preparing for a new show in the USA, Jack receives a phone call from his secretary. A story about Jack has emerged on social media which has gone viral. It has details of his relationship with a young woman, Marian Davies, 30 years previously. 

He is more than ready to dismiss the warning at first, but the pressing urgency in his secretary’s voice leads him to stop in his tracks. He looks back over the many decades, since he last saw Marian. Back to a time before social media, to a time when he controlled the narrative; people listened to him and he was trusted. But one question kept cropping-up: why has Marian reappeared? Just at the time when there are so many other parallels with the eighties. Political unrest, Thatcherism and the horrors of IRA terrorism all uncannily mirrored in 21st century Britain. From terrorism from extremists, in the name of the ISIS and Britain First, another female Prime Minister and a nation divided from the political fall-out of a divisive Brexit result in the 2016 British European referendum.

He is more than ready to dismiss the warning at first, but the pressing urgency in his secretary's voice leads him to stop in his tracks. He looks back over the many decades, since he last saw Marian. Back to a time before social media, to a time when he controlled the narrative; people listened to him and he was trusted. But one question kept cropping-up: why has Marian reappeared? Just at the time when there are so many other parallels with the eighties. Political unrest, Thatcherism and the horrors of IRA terrorism all uncannily mirrored in 21st century Britain. From terrorism from extremists, in the name of the ISIS and Britain First, another female Prime Minister and a nation divided from the political fall-out of a divisive Brexit result in the 2016 British European referendum.

I urge you to read my novel to make your own judgement! Did Jack use Marian or was she using him? Mo.

Leslie Blake's review:
I read it in all consuming haste. The juxtaposition of different themes are woven into a fine tapestry. The messages subtle but bound to be understood for those with eyes to see. An impressive read.

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An intelligent heart felt read from this new author. Can’t wait to read Mo McDonald’s next offering.

by Emma Penman


Mo is relying on complete strangers to take a look at her story and to see if they too are intrigued by the many different reasons that her friends and family were, when it came out as a hard copy. Please take a look and judge for yourselves as to how many stars you would award it.

by Maureen Ramsay


A beautiful piece of writing that hooks writers from the start and refuses to relinquish it's hold on you long after you've ended the book and attempted to move onto another. Gorgeous.

by Taylor


Jake Kelly is a famous TV broadcaster in the 1980s who one day finds a letter from a woman named Marian Davies in his pile of fan mail.

Their attraction is mutual, and Jake arranges for a studio visit to meet her, and maybe more. Of course both Jake and Marian are married to other people but that doesn’t stop Jake from wanting to embark on a “social experiment” which has terrible consequences for both of them.

Fast forward 30 years, and just as he is preparing for a new show in America, Marian reappears and shares their story on social media. By why?

Letters to the editor is a clever novel that juxtaposes the various realities of people in Britain throughout the various decades of recent history. Those feeling nostalgic of the 1980s or who are perhaps curious about them are in luck, as the book contains an excellent description of the various political and socioeconomic events of the decade.

The story is told from two different points of view: Jake’s and Marian’s, who ponder philosophically about the different realities they are living.

An excellent, cerebral read that will wrap your senses and which you will not want to put down!

by Jemima


Letters to the Editor was a very old-fashioned book - both in the good and in the bad sense of that. Very slow, very character-driven, very... last century romantic. I strongly believe that many people would really enjoy this book but it definitely it's not everybody's cup of tea.

by Preslava


In mo McDonald's Letter to the Editor Jack Kelly is a famous TV Broadcaster and author in the late 70's who finds an instant and mutual attraction to a married woman fan Marian Davies, who he's arranged a studio visit for after receiving a few fan letters. . Married himself Jack embarks on a psychological and philosophical experiment with the ,at first, unsuspecting Marian. A rather unpleasant and narcissistic character Jack learns the truth behind "be careful what you wish for" as his plotting and scheming has drastic results for both of them. 30 years later he is due to leave for a America and a prestigious TV show when he receives a letter from Marian..
It took me a while to get into this book but it was worth persevering with. It's told from the perspectives of both main characters and at first I was a bit bemused that they appeared to be almost the same person,but if I've got it right that was the whole point. The sense of period is well presented with contemporary events such as the election of Margaret Thatcher used to show the exact timing of the protagonist's correspondence and Marian's frustration with being a housewife but wanting more while not wanting to affect her marriage. drives her on. Jack is not a very pleasant character who likes to be in control but finds the whole experiment backfires badly as he discovers things about himself and his life he'd rather not have. Quite a cerebral read i'd guess it's not for the general reader as getting your head around some of the philosophical elements is a struggle for us non-intellectuals but they're an integral part of the story. A good read,if not an easy one, a bit "wordy" in places but ultimately satisfying.

by Dave


Jack Kelly is a major celebrity, best selling novelist and major TV star. He has a great love of Psychology.
Back in his 1980's heyday he is contacted by a a fan, Marian Davies. all she is looking for is a word from someone she greatly admires.
Using tecniques learned from his Psycology heroes, Jack then carries out a major Psychological experiment at a distance. Using his TV show and novels he sends subliminal messages to Marian and manipulates her to change her life and head in new directions. This is carried out over 3 or 4 years.
Along the way Jack gets caught up and not everything goes according to his elaborately laid plan.


An entirely unique book, to my knowledge anyway.

I was close to giving up part way through due to my lack of knowledge in the field, there was times I was confused and found some of the psycology a bit over my head but I'm glad I persevered for the pay off. I really did end up enjoying the book immensley.

by Stephen


Mo McDonald

Mo McDonald. Born in the 1940s, lived in London until two years ago when she moved to Bristol with her husband to start a new and exciting life near to their family. "I thought that London was the hub of the universe so it has been wonderful to find out how vibrant a city Bristol is. I have found my love for life here and for the Arts right on our doorstep," she said.

Despite growing up in London soon after the war, she had a happy childhood. Her mother & father were instrumental in making her life interesting and colourful. On leaving school she met her husband Richard and they have two daughters, Amanda & Emma. Mo was a stay at home house-wife and mother for many years. She had various and interesting jobs e.g. owning her own in-store flower shop before returning to the world of commerce in 1996, taking on a very important financial project communicating with fund managers and gathering information on the world economy. She did this project until she moved to Bristol in 2018.

Writing her first novel "Letters to The Editor" was a 'dream come true' as she had a lifelong love of literature and decided that she had a story to tell.


A new author with a different look at life in the 1980s
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