Troubador Biological Systems of the Brain

Released: 13/12/2008

eISBN: 9781780888415

Format: eBook

Review this Book

Author Website

Biological Systems of the Brain

Unlocking the Secrets of Consciousness

by

Every minute of everyday, waking or sleeping, your brain is being programmed. Who or what is doing the programming, and how a complex mass of proteins and chemicals can control your every move, is the subject of this ground-breaking work.

Drawing on the disciplines of computer programming and a shared interest in the amazing creative potential of the human brain, Charles Ross and Shirely Redpath present a series of radical theories about how the cluster of neurons that is our brain develops into the accumulation of understanding and consciousness that each one of us has come to identify as our unique selves.

Using clear, everyday language, they guide the reader through the labyrinth of brain research and behavioural observations to find answers to some of the questions that have puzzled scientists and philosophers for thousands of years.

The theories in this book point the way to new avenues for research into the physical development of the brain, ways to counteract the debilitating progress of degenerative neural diseases ,and the development of more effective methods for teaching young brains.

See paper published by the Cornell University arXiv site: http://arxiv.org/abs/0905.2836
"I think this is an interesting contribution with the potential to spark a debate on these exciting topics. I think the important role of glial cells had been largely overlooked by neuroscience society and is likely to require our rethinking of the way in which our brains perform computations and store memories."
Dr Vladislav Volman PhD Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, University of California at San Diego, Computational Neurobiology Lab, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, California.

See paper at Cornell University site http://arxiv.org/abs/0905.2836
"I think this is an interesting contribution with the potential to spark a debate on these exciting topics. I think the important role of glial cells had been largely overlooked by neuroscience society and is likely to require our rethinking of the way in which our brains perform computations and store memories." Dr Vladislav Volman PhD Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, University of California at San Diego, Computational Neurobiology Lab, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, California.
"I have to say that “Biological Systems of the Brain”, is the best book I have read on the interactions of the physical, intellectual and spiritual aspects of the brain." Mike Evans,
Managing Partner, Knowledge Management, Yorkshire.


“…no one has ever come up with a plausible and coherent answer [to the problem of consciousness]. The ideas presented here …. will surely provoke further thought and discussion wherever they are heard.”
-- Michael Brooks,
New Scientist consultant,author of
13 Things That Don’t Make Sense

The authors invite you to post your comments, opinions, thoughts and ideas on the development of the human mind on the BrainMindForum. See web link.

REVIEWS:
These ideas are interesting and provocative.
Dr. R. Douglas Fields. Chief, Nervous System Development & Plasticity Section, National Institutes of Health, NICHD, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
Member, Editorial Board, Scientific American.

I think this is an interesting contribution with the potential to spark a debate on these exciting topics. I think the important role of glial cells had been largely overlooked by neuroscience society and is likely to require our rethinking of the way in which our brains perform computations and store memories.
Dr Vladislav Volman PhD. Center for Theoretical Biological Physics, University of California at San Diego, Computational Neurobiology Lab, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, California, USA.

“Biological Systems of the Brain” is a fertile piece of work which contains many thought-provoking ideas. The idea of describing the brain from a systems analysis perspective is brilliant – it makes clear many things that are obscure when described in traditional biological terms. In the part of the book on the formation of memory, I do not necessarily go along with all the conclusions, but I can see that the theory would fill gaps. The role of glial cells in modulating neuronal activity is an exciting new field of discovery and may well throw up something akin to the book’s suggestion of glial bridges. Epigenetics is a [further] area where very little is known. The authors’ speculations show a degree of insight, which is often lacking in text books on the subject. They are very interesting; as, indeed, are the thoughts on … the possibility of pro-active evolution. Looking at the brain as a system is a wonderfully revealing device which makes clear many aspects of brain function that otherwise may seem quite mysterious. “Biological Systems of the Brain” is well structured, and deeply informative…
Rita Carter is a science writer, lecturer and broadcaster who specialises in the human brain. Author of ‘Mapping the Mind’, ‘Exploring Consciousness’, ‘Mapping the Memory’ and Multiplicity’. www.ritacarter.co.uk.


Congratulations for a really stimulating, thought provoking and lateral book. It's the sort of book I'll have to go back to time and again as it brings together a lot of ideas from disparate disciplines and thinking.
Among many questions and hypotheses you've thrown up, I find the idea of a research project to compare DNA makeup in individuals over time is particularly fascinating.
John Riley, Managing Editor Computer Weekly 1966 – 2006

I have to say that “Biological Systems of the Brain”, is the best book I have read on the interactions of the physical, intellectual and spiritual aspects of the brain.
Mike Evans,
Managing Partner, Knowledge Management, Yorkshire UK.

http://www.BrainMindForum.co.uk

Absolutely delighted to get a copy of this for my Granddaughter. Not gonna lie she is slightly under the recommended age range, but she did have a good chew of the corners.
The story itself is lovely. Reminded me of the Enid Blyton stuff of my own childhood, but with a nicer, more modern message about friendship. My girl loved being read to, and the story was engaging enough to keep any adults entertained during the reading.
We meet a lovely dungaree wearing cat named Harvey and his motley crew of friends as they travel on the bus to the moon. They head to a circus where Harvey rescues a new friend, but also loses some of the others and Harvey and Gretel have to do all that they can to find Chester and Nelly and still get back to the bus before it leaves for home. They do cut it fine, and I imagine a lot of children getting over-excited as they push things to the wire.
I can't wait til my lovely girl is old enough to read this for herself, but until then, it is a book that will happily go onto the bedtime reading rotation that she has, and will keep her entertained for years to come.
And the illustrations are lovely, Emily the illustrator did a marvellous job of bringing them all to life

by Cinnomen


Loving this book. Please write more.

by A R


My daughter loved the story. She really enjoyed the part about the Sweet shop and as soon as we were finished wanted to hear it again, so we've read it twice in a row. She also took it to school to show her friends.

by Caroline Corpas


Charles T. Ross and Shirley F. Redpath

Charles T. Ross has worked for over fifty years on the entrepreneurial side of computing, and was involved in four world firsts in the design of computer software systems. He has applied his knowledge of systems design to the workings of the brain, having written numerous articles and given lectures on “what is thinking?”.

Shirley F. Redpath has over thirty years experience as a business strategy consultant, facilitator and writer. She uses creative and cognitive methodologies to draw out new and more effective thinking strategies in management teams and is currently researching various approaches to reprogramming the brain for more fulfilling living.

Also by Charles T. Ross and Shirley F. Redpath / Related Books