Published: 28/02/2017
ISBN: 9781785898723
eISBN: 9781788034999
Format: Paperback/eBook



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About the Author



I was born and brought up in West Yorkshire and trained as a teacher. I taught in London, Hampshire and Leicestershire and then spent five years as an education adviser for Northamptonshire Local Auth... read more

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Paradise Girl
by Phill Featherstone

A highly infectious and incurable virus spreads worldwide. Seventeen-year-old Kerryl Shaw and her family live on a remote farm and think they will be safe, but the plague advances. Despite deaths around them, the Shaws survive. However, this changes when a stranger arrives, and it soon becomes apparent he has brought the infection to their door. One by one the family succumbs, leaving Kerryl alone.

Kerryl is sure it’s only a matter of time before she, too, dies. She decides to record what she thinks will be her final days in a diary. She realises that it will never be read, so she imagines a reader and calls him Adam. As loneliness and isolation affect the balance of her mind, Adam ceases to be an imaginary character and becomes real to her.

Communications break down and services fail. Unexplained events build fear and menace: Kerryl hears her name called in the night; she’s attacked by stray animals; she’s molested when she visits the town; she sees a stranger outside her house, who vanishes when she tries to make contact; objects appear and disappear. The climax comes when she finds a text message on her phone. Who is texting her? How? She thinks it can only be Adam, because by now there is no one else left. Another text invites her to a rendezvous at the Bride Stones, a beauty spot popular with lovers, and she leaves for what she is sure will be a meeting with Adam...

“This is such an engrossing read I found it impossible to put down...This is writing of a high literary standard, with the kind of psychological depth which lingers in the mind long after reading.”
– Sarah Vincent, critic and author of The Testament of Vida Tremayne.

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"This is such an engrossing read, I found it impossible to put down. A cliché I know, but it happens to be true. In fact there were times, especially reading the Purple Diary which doesn’t spare us from the gruesome details of the Infection, that I wished I could tear myself away for just a moment. I felt like I needed a breath of air. But then I just had to know what would happen to Kerryl, one of the most engaging heroines I’ve come across in a long time. I sped through the pages and read in about two sittings. Yet this is more than just a pacey page-turning thriller. This is writing of a high literary standard, with the kind of psychological depth which lingers in the mind long after reading." (Sarah Vincent, author of The Testament of Vida Tremayne).

"Bought it this week for my Kindle. Started to read it last night & was hooked!"

"YA dystopia isn't my usual reading, but this was recommended to me, so I gave it a go. It's well written, full of suspense, and it is a page turner. The narrator, Kerryl, is engaging and sympathetic, I warmed to her very much, and was rooting for her throughout.
I found the ending a little confusing... I'm not sure what happened? I think it was left open to interpretation, which I quite like, despite the ambiguity. I'm still thinking about the story the morning after finishing, which is always a sign a book has resonance. Recommended!"

"I've just finished reading Paradise Girl - wow, what a page turner I couldn't put it down." Emma

"Most people who know me know that I have a short attention span. If a book (or movie, or game) doesn't interest me, I never finish it. Woah! Such was NOT the case with Paradise Girl. I simply could not put it down. If I hadn't had to stop reading for that pesky thing called work, I would have read it straight through! Read it! You won't be sorry."
Emily Schrader

http://www.phillfeatherstone.net

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Gilly918

This book is a must read! I can hardly put it down, thank you for writing such an amazing book!

by Tiffany


"YA dystopia isn't my usual reading, but this was recommended to me, so I gave it a go. It's well written, full of suspense, and it is a page turner. The narrator, Kerryl, is engaging and sympathetic, I warmed to her very much, and was rooting for her throughout.
I found the ending a little confusing... I'm not sure what happened? I think it was left open to interpretation, which I quite like, despite the ambiguity. I'm still thinking about the story the morning after finishing, which is always a sign a book has resonance. Recommended!"

by Louise


I've just finished reading Paradise Girl - wow, what a page turner I couldn't put it down.

by Emma D


A deadly virus has all but killed off humanity and, for all she knows, Kerryl might be the only person left alive. Alone on an isolated Yorkshire hill farm, she finds some solace in writing a diary dedicated to an imaginary ideal man and through that diary we learn how the virus spread, how it was accompanied by the breakdown of law and order and how Kerryl tries to cope after all around her have died.

This is a compelling book, well written but easy to read. The author succeeds brilliantly in getting inside the mind of the teenage Kerryl, conveying her thoughts and revealing her gradual mental and physical deterioration.

The last section is unexpected and raises questions that linger in the mind long after the last page has been read.

Altogether a super read, accomplished and engrossing.

by Amazon review


Wow, what a page turning adventure. I was hooked from the very start. Descriptive short chapters enable you to journey through each day alongside Kerryl and the obstacles she has to overcome.

by Amazon review


Thoughtful dystopian novel, well-written. Kerryl is a well-drawn character, and I feared for her throughout. Good descriptions of landscape, and lots of mystery to keep me turning the pages.

by Amazon review


A highly infectious disease pops up in Africa and slowly travels through out the world, with outbreaks first in Asia and then in Europe as Kerryl Shaw is appling to university. Before she knows it the schools have been closed and the infection has reached their town. Kerryl and her family live on a remote farm so the chances of the infection reaching them are low. Then Kerryl does something that causes the infection on to their land and soon her grandparents and her mother are all dead and her twin brother Landon has left. She is stuck alone on the farm, anxiously waiting to for her turn to get sick.

I actually really enjoyed this, like way more than I thought I would. I was unsure whether or not I wanted to give it four or five stars because really I think it's a solid 4.5 and I decided not to be petty this one time and round up. The writing and voice of the book were excellent. I was totally pulled in to it. I was surprised that a man wrote it because I think he captures the voice of a teenage girl pretty well. The whole deterioration that takes place mentally for Kerryl was so sutble also I didn't even notice it until the end when we find out that she's being watched. The entries from the days shes alone on the farm capture the loneliness and boredom really well also. The ending was really sad but it was worked really well, I feel like it could have fallen flat pretty easily but he managed to make it work. I'm just very impressed by the book it was really good.

by NetGalley reviewer


Wow! This was an interesting read which started off slow and steady....and became really complex and interesting quite rapidly! I have to say that the Infection originally made me think about Ebola...not entirely the same thing, but quite scary just the same!

The plot was believable and kept my attention throughout. I did not expect the ending until it started to unravel. It was really surprising, yet not so surprising at the same time, if you get my feel?
I thought Kerryl was a main character that, despite the crazy circumstances, was doing quite well at keeping the pretext of a normal life...until things started to get a bit crazy and she began seeing things that weren't really there.

I think the ending was the most interesting part of the book, simply because it really explains everything so clearly and concisely...

I will definitely consider reading more of Phil Featherstone's work!

by Mackenzie Rayburn-Madden (NetGalley)


This was a great book and had me hooked from the moment I started. The way the book was written as two diaries made it particularly interesting and the first chapter really set the scene well. Kerryl was totally believeable throughout and I felt like I went through all her different emotions with her. At first I wasn't too sure about the premis that the reader was male but this all revealed itself by the end of the storyand I now understand that decision. A wonderful, gripping read. If there is a sequel I will deifnitely be first in line!

by Debbie Slater


A highly infectious and incurable virus spreads worldwide. Seventeen-year-old Kerryl Shaw and her family live on a remote farm and think they will be safe, but the plague advances. Despite deaths around them, the Shaws survive. However, this changes when a stranger arrives, and it soon becomes apparent he has brought the infection to their door. One by one the family succumbs, leaving Kerryl alone. Kerryl is sure it’s only a matter of time before she, too, dies. She decides to record what she thinks will be her final days in a diary. She realises that it will never be read, so she imagines a reader and calls him Adam. As loneliness and isolation affect the balance of her mind, Adam ceases to be an imaginary character and becomes real to her. Communications break down and services fail. Unexplained events build fear and menace: Kerryl hears her name called in the night; she’s attacked by stray animals; she’s molested when she visits the town; she sees a stranger outside her house, who vanishes when she tries to make contact; objects appear and disappear. The climax comes when she finds a text message on her phone. Who is texting her? How? She thinks it can only be Adam, because by now there is no one else left. Another text invites her to a rendezvous at the Bride Stones, a beauty spot popular with lovers, and she leaves for what she is sure will be a meeting with Adam...
OMG. An absolutely fantastic read with brilliant characters. Although a little slow in places it picked up. I didn't expect that. 5*.

by Sue Wallace


This book revolves around Kerryl and how she gets through a plague epidemic. Did this book give me a book hangover? Yes! Did I see the twist coming? No! I've always wondered how I would get by if everyone I knew (and didn't know) died and I was on my own. Kerryl's journey with this was very engaging to me. She went about it almost systematically and as if she was expecting it all to go back to the way it was before the plague. Although some parts were ramblings I feel that being alone that long I would ramble too. She was smart and used her head but you could see her slide downward. I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

by Tammy VanScoy


 

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