Published: 28/08/2016
ISBN: 9781785892752
Format: Paperback



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Pat (above right) and Mary (above left) have worked, researched and published together for more than 20years, producing very many research papers and journal articles as well as conference papers and ... read more

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Crying in Cupboards
What happens when teachers are bullied?
by Pat Bricheno and Mary Thornton

Bullying in the workplace makes teachers’ lives a misery. It is a destructive social process which can lead to deteriorating physical and mental health, depression, even suicide. It not only destroys teachers’ lives, it also damages teacher recruitment and retention, and the finances and reputations of schools.

In Crying in Cupboards, teachers tell their stories, giving real examples of bullying behaviour and the consequences for those affected by it. The teachers’ stories are at the heart of the book and can be dipped into or read quite separately from the underpinning literature and research methods. Senior school managers and Union Officials describe strategies and tactics used in handling it, offer suggestions on what steps to take once an incident has occurred, and suggest how to positively manage acts of workplace bullying.

Crying in Cupboards looks at reasons for bullying of teachers, who become targets, what constitutes bullying behavior in schools and what does not. It also discusses what the law can and can’t do about it, including health and employment ramifications.

The well-being of teachers is an important, but often neglected area, yet the education of our children depends on it. The current climate surrounding teachers’ work is one of high pressure, stress and anxiety. Unfortunately it is also a climate that allows bullying behaviour to flourish. Crying in Cupboards is therefore an invaluable resource for anyone wishing to understand adult bullying of teachers, whether you are a teacher being bullied at work, a manager wishing to prevent or reverse bullying in your workplace, a concerned relative, school governor, politician, an academic researcher or simply interested in the struggles teachers can face in the workplace.

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Crying in Cupboards explores teachers' experiences of being bullied at work. It is written in a reader-friendly style so that their stories can be shared with a wide audience of people who are interested in what is actually happening in our schools. If you are a teacher being bullied at work, a relative or friend, and finding it difficult to make sense of the experience; or a workplace manager wishing to prevent or address bullying in your school, then this book is for you. It describes adult to adult bullying that takes place within school settings, how school managers react and deal with it, and what Unions can and can’t do to help those being bullied. It is based on high quality, recent and valid academic research, the essentials of which are included in order to meet the needs of the educational research community. However, accessible story-style narratives form the core of the book: these are anonymised to maintain confidentiality regarding individuals and their schools or Unions identities, while at the same time giving voice to the teachers (and Senior Managers and Union officials) real-life experiences of bullying in the educational workplace.

When we first interviewed the teachers many were ill, and some were very ill indeed. But they willingly gave their time, and opened up the pain of being bullied into ill-health, to two stranger researchers in order that we could help to tell their stories. They actively keep in touch; most of them regularly updating us on their personal and professional progress, which we hope is towards a full recovery. Most of our bullied teachers are now in a better place, but as the reader will see their scars endure.

The ‘churn’ of teachers, including their potential departure from the profession, is exacerbated by the bullying that takes place in schools. But it is rarely named as such because more acceptable labels are preferred and negotiated, in order to maintain good references and a career, to facilitate moving on, or to avoid the additional stresses imposed by often unwinnable conflicts and official tribunals. Crying in Cupboards tells the reader about the bullying of teachers by other adults in schools. It demonstrates the impact bullying has on their personal and professional lives, their health and their future employment, and it explores reasons for being bullied, actions taken to address it, and possible ways forward for teachers and their senior managers.
Previewing the book in draft format, Dr Priya M. Vaidya, Assistant Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Mumbai, has commented:
‘Your book is thought provoking. It made me think – go back – think if bullying of any sort happened with me or some others. I am sure this book will help to bring some reform within institutes and among the so called educated. This text should be a prescribed text in Schools of Education in the world.’

http://theconversation.com/how-a-culture-of-bullying-is-driving-teachers-from-their-jobs-68256

Cambridge News

Crying in Cupboards is an emotional, and educational, read for those of you out there who do not realise that this happens daily to our teachers and equally for those of you who are going through this type of unacceptable behaviour from those around you. Although it probably happens in all industires to one extent or another, Crying in Cupboards brings home a stark classroom reality : teachers are getting bullied.

The format of Crying in Cupboards enables any prospective reader to dip in and out of the differant sections: the profound research of the initial chapters, the harsh reality of the teachers' stories and the comments of those who should be in a position to support and guide them through such times.

Crying in Cupboards should have a copy in every staff room for the young generation of teacher to enable them to realise that this goes on, through to the more seasoned practioner who is no less of a target. It also has sections from the heart of those in leadership positions (some of whom have, themselves been bullied) who want to help and last, but not least, from the professional associations who are there to guide and support.

One overriding message of Crying in Cupboards is that you do not have to suffer this and you certainly do not have to suffer it alone. Bullying thrives on isolation of the victim. Crying in Cupboards gets the message out there and raises an awareness.

It is well worth a read for the victims of bullying and for those who wish to tackle it alike. The research done into this awful phenomenon is an eye-opener and there are clear trends that emerge from it. The conclusions drawn are there for the taking: something can be done about this to stop our teaching population having to resort to crying in the cupboard.

by Carole Horstead


Crying in Cupboards is an emotional, and educational, read for those of you out there who do not realise that this happens daily to our teachers and equally for those of you who are going through this type of unacceptable behaviour from those around you. Although it probably happens in all industires to one extent or another, Crying in Cupboards brings home a stark classroom reality : teachers are getting bullied.

The format of Crying in Cupboards enables any prospective reader to dip in and out of the differant sections: the profound research of the initial chapters, the harsh reality of the teachers' stories and the comments of those who should be in a position to support and guide them through such times.

Crying in Cupboards should have a copy in every staff room for the young generation of teacher to enable them to realise that this goes on, through to the more seasoned practioner who is no less of a target. It also has sections from the heart of those in leadership positions (some of whom have, themselves been bullied) who want to help and last, but not least, from the professional associations who are there to guide and support.

One overriding message of Crying in Cupboards is that you do not have to suffer this and you certainly do not have to suffer it alone. Bullying thrives on isolation of the victim. Crying in Cupboards gets the message out there and raises an awareness.

It is well worth a read for the victims of bullying and for those who wish to tackle it alike. The research done into this awful phenomenon is an eye-opener and there are clear trends that emerge from it. The conclusions drawn are there for the taking: something can be done about this to stop our teaching population having to resort to crying in the cupboard.

by Carole Horstead


Education 3-13: published on-line 5 Oct 2016 (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03004279.2016.1234497)
Review by Malini Mistry (Malini.mistry@beds.ac.uk)
This book is a well-illustrated guide to the hidden thoughts and voices of a range of teachers in both the primary and secondary sector showing the similarities faced by many professionals in terms of being bullied. This review for Education 3-13 focuses on how teachers might use these unvoiced thoughts as to better understand the reality of what other teachers feel when managing learning and teaching.
The book is organised with a short introduction within each section ranging from the historical context in terms of what we already know to the voices of teachers, managers, and unions, and finally what we know now about the bullying of teachers. The two authors approach the content from the perspectives of the individuals’ experiences (teachers, managers, and unions).
There are sections ranging from the contextual background to how theory supports some of the experiences of these individuals. It looks at the reasons behind why bullying can take place, to what happens to individuals in the process of being bullied, and also what are the consequences if nothing is done about it. Furthermore, it also gives advice on what the law suggests about moving forward for all. Within each section, there is an introduction that gives an overview of the structure of context. The majority of the book comprises of the thoughts of individuals through specific examples or case studies, but there are also some links to a range of statistics that support the discussion taking place.
Although this book does not have a range of activities for the reader to reflect on, it does however suggest a range of strategies that can be considered when dealing with certain situations from different perspectives. An interesting feature is how theory has been linked in parts to styles of leadership, in leading and managing different scenarios.
Perhaps sections that included discussion points or reflective points may be useful for the reader in engaging with others to see how situations can be resolved so that the pupils are not affected by the staff. However, the strength of this book lies in the number of real life stories about bullying across the sector which shows that it is more common in education than most of us would like to admit.
This book is useful for leadership staff working in both the primary and secondary sectors, and also newer teachers, to ensure that they are not alone in what they are feeling if bullying in the work place is occurring.
In conclusion, the book represents a valuable tool for schools to inspire and support them to give strategies on how to deal with bullying in the workplace in a positive way.

by Mary for Malani


 

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